Tuesday, October 13, 2009

kaitlin.Ls coin math for october 10, 2009

On Friday we talked about this image, Mr.H gave us a task to make up questions about how much money is in the jar. Second: we would share our quetions to the whole class in our group. then we would see if that quetion would help us out or if it had nothing to do with math. then he told us that there was $100 American coins in the jar. Then we made more quetions and Mr.H origanised the quetions to red to being the first quetions, then black to being just questons and nothing to do with math, then blue was for the second questions, then purple for the last. then Mr.H gave us homework to answer a purple question and any other but black.




My homework! :)
1.how would you sort the coins.
I would sort them by pennies, nicles, dimes, and quarters because those are the only coins in America because theier $1 is a bill and Canada has loonies and toonies.



2. would the jar look the same if it was converted to Canadian money.
No it would not because Canadians have more coins becasue they have loonies and toonies so they would take up alot of space in the jar.



part 2 : jar of coins


How much is the jar is filled with Canadian coin?
if there was Canadian coins in the jar it would be filled 35%.

Could you fill the jar with $100 american and $100 canadian?Why?
No because if you put $100 american and $100 canadian coins in the jar it will have an extra 104 coins

If you started droping coins on the jar on January 1, 2010, what day would you finish filling up the jar with $canadian and $american?

If you keep dropping 1 coin every day it will take you until January 15, 2013. Because if you take 780 and times it by 370 it will be 115o then take 1150 and divide that by 365.25 it will by 3.15 (round to hundreths). An example of my thinking is:(780 + 370 = 1150) {1150 ÷ 365.25 = 3.15(round to hundredths)

2 comments:

Alexander8-73 October 14, 2009 at 12:40 PM  

Nice job Kaitlin good explanation.

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