Thursday, January 14, 2010

Hannah's scribepost for January 13.

Sorry it's late.


question 4.


















question8.
How many hundred grids are needed to show each of the following percents?
a.) 300% = 3 hundreds grids

b.) 466% = 5 hundreds grids
c.) 1200% = 12 hundreds grids
question9.
Give two examples where a percent greater than 100% might be found in everyday life.
- Nutritional facts.





















- Receipts (taxes)




















question 16.
Suppose one large square represents 100%. The square is divided into smaller equal-sized pieces.

a.) If there are 1000 pieces, what percent do 17 pieces represent?


















b.) If there are two large squares each divided into ten smaller pieces, what percent do 13 pieces represent ?


















c.) If the large square is divided into eight smaller pieces, show how to represent 87 1/2 and 56 1/4.




















8 comments:

Jemineth873 January 26, 2010 at 9:54 PM  

Good Job Hannah , i was able to understand your explanation to the questions and the path you took to get the answers because of the pictures you posted up , good job (:

Camille873 January 27, 2010 at 6:24 PM  

good job hannah , i understand it very well and nice pictures you put alot of them which was great .

Mr. Oldcorn February 2, 2010 at 8:47 AM  

Thanks for your suggestions to our class Hannah. I plan to show them your post later today. Please, keep it up!!1

Abigail8-73 February 2, 2010 at 11:17 PM  

Good job Hannah! (: I really like how you make the explaination brief and simple! (: and I also like the pictures you made! AWESOME JOB! (:

Abigail8-73 February 2, 2010 at 11:17 PM  

Good job Hannah! (: I really like how you make the explaination brief and simple! (: and I also like the pictures you made! AWESOME JOB! (:

Abigail8-73 February 2, 2010 at 11:17 PM  

Good job Hannah! (: I really like how you make the explaination brief and simple! (: and I also like the pictures you made! AWESOME JOB! (:

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